LOW COST SHIPPING NATIONWIDE - FREE FOR ORDERS OVER $99* !

Articles

Donate Mother's Milk Bank

Donate Mother's Milk Bank

 

If you have an abundance of milk and would be willing to donate this life saving gift to the Mothers' Milk Bank, there is currently a desperate shortage. If you can help, please contact the Mothers' Milk Bank. Information is listed below.

REQUIREMENTS
Donor milk banks receive milk from lactating mothers who have been carefully screened for health concerns and communicable diseases, similarly to the way blood banks screen donors. Additionally, milk bank donors must:

  • be non-smokers
  • not consume excluded medications or alcohol within the specified exclusion period

If you are eligible to donate blood, then you probably meet the criteria for donating milk.

Interested in donating? Click Here for More Details!

The Mothers' Milk Bank, located at Valley Medical Center in San Jose, CA, is a licensed tissue bank that has been providing milk banking services for over 40 years. Since 1974, over 10,000 donors have provided over 3 million ounces of milk to help babies survive and thrive. Last year our volunteer mothers donated over 507,000oz. of milk to babies in 13 states!

All milk banks are not created equal. Mothers' Milk Bank is non-profit 501(3)(c) organization, and a charter member of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA) Many milk banks sell donated milk to for-profit companies that process and distribute the milk. To guarantee that you are donating to a non-profit milk bank, make sure that they are a member of the Human Milk Banking Association of North America (HMBANA).  HMBANA Milk Banks are committed to:

  • Maintaining non-profit status
  • Providing community service
  • Offering reasonable prices
  • Ensuring the highest quality
Location Contact
Mothers' Milk Bank
Valley Medical Center
751 S. Bascom Ave.
San Jose, CA 95128
Toll Free Phone:(877) 375-6645
Website: mothersmilk.org
Facebook: Facebook.com/mothersmilkbanksj

More Resources

La Leche League International

Northwest Mothers' Milk Bank

Mothers' Milk Bank Northeast

Mothers' Milk Bank Austin

Mothers' Milk Bank of North Texas

WakeMed Mothers' Milk Bank in Raleigh, NC (serves New York State)

Mothers' Milk Bank of Ohio

Mothers' Milk Bank Colorado

Indiana Mothers' Milk Bank

Find More Milk Banks at Human Milk Banking Association of North America (includes locations Canada)

Continue reading

Study Proves Importance of IBCLC Care

Study Proves Importance of IBCLC Care
A recent study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that patients connected with International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLC) were three times more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding at three months, more likely to be exclusively breastfeeding at one month and less likely to wean in the first six months Continue reading

Video: How to Increase Milk Supply

Video: How to Increase Milk Supply

Corky Harvey, RN, MS, IBCLC explains why so many women worry that they aren't making enough milk for their babies and what they can do about it.

 

 


Essential Breastfeeding Support and Baby Care Items

The Pump Station & Nurtury® has decades of experience providing new families with outstanding educational, breastfeeding and baby care support, including products and classes which can make all the difference to you and your baby. To see a list of some of the essential products that our Lactation Professionals have recommended, click Essential Breastfeeding and Baby Care Products

 

See Other Breastfeeding and Baby Care Help Topics

Continue reading

Videos: Common Questions About Breastfeeding

Videos: Common Questions About Breastfeeding

 

Back to Breastfeeding Help Library

How do I know if My Baby is Getting Enough to Eat?

Published on August 2014
Corky Harvey, MS, RN, IBCLC answers a common question from nursing mothers, "How do I know if my baby is getting enough?"

 



When to Start Pumping?

Published on August 2014
Wendy Haldeman, MN, RN, IBCLC answers a common question from nursing mothers, "When do I start pumping?"

 



How to Increase Milk Supply While Working?

Published on August 2014
Barbara Zimmermann, RN, BSN, IBCLC, CEIM answers a common question from nursing mothers, "How can I increase my milk supply while working?"

 



Does it Matter if you Mix Breastmilk with Formula?

Published on August 2014
Wendy Haldeman, MN, RN, IBCLC answers the question: Can you combine breastmilk and formula?

For more information on...
Breastfeeding including classes, support groups, breast pumps, certified lactation consultants and more.

Continue reading

Video: How to Breastfeed - Deep Latch Technique

Video: How to Breastfeed - Deep Latch Technique

 

Back to Breastfeeding Help Library

Originally Published from Fit Pregnancy Magazine:

A step-by-step video with tips on "How to Use the Deep Latch Technique" from Corky Harvey, RN, MS, IBCLC a lactation consultant at The Pump Station & Nurtury™

For more information on...
Breastfeeding including classes, support groups, breast pumps, certified lactation consultants and more


See Other Breastfeeding and Baby Care Help Topics

Continue reading

Video: How to Use a Breast Pump

Video: How to Use a Breast Pump

 Originally published in Fit Pregnancy Magazine:

A step-by-step video guide on "How To Use a Breast Pump" from Corky Harvey, RN, MS, IBCLC 

 

For more information on...
Breastfeeding including classes, support groups, breast pumps, certified lactation consultants and more.

Renting A Pump

Purchasing A Pump

Breastfeeding Product Essentials

You can also visit our...

Breastfeeding Help Library

Continue reading

Video: How to Breastfeed in Public

Video: How to Breastfeed in Public

For more information on...
Breastfeeding including classes, support groups, breast pumps, certified lactation consultants and more. 

Back to Breastfeeding Help Library

Published on 2008:
A step-by-step video with tips from Corky Harvey, RN, MS, IBCLC and Wendy Haldeman RN, MN, IBCLC 

 



Published 2009:
Answers from Corky & Wendy about nursing clothing and gear:
  • What are the easiest clothing options for breastfeeding moms?
  • What's a nursing cover-up?
  • How do I use a blanket if I want to cover up while breastfeeding in public?
  • How can I use my sling as a nursing cover-up?
  • How does a built-in nursing bra work?
  • and more
Continue reading

Breastfeeding Tips for the Working Mama

Breastfeeding Tips for the Working Mama

by Linda Mansolillo

Returning to the workplace while maintaining an adequate milk supply can be very challenging. One of our amazing mothers was very successful in her goal to provide her baby with ample breastmilk while working full time and traveling. Linda Mansolillo has generously taken time out from her hectic schedule to compile a long list of invaluable tips for pumping while traveling and working outside the home.

General Pumping Tips for the Working Mama

  • Keep baby reminders with you, videos, lovies, pictures to help you remember this amazing person you are doing this for
  • Keep a supply of scarves in your car/tied to your purse for coverage if you need to pump in unexpected places
  • Pack extra zip lock bags to separate dirty parts
  • Pack the night before as you are less like to forget something
  • Invest in a manual/hand pump in case your electric one breaks
  • If all else fails hand express in a bathroom after you've put some warm towels on your breasts to help release milk
  • Be an advocate for your pump time- that meeting you need to leave to pump is not more important. No one needs to know why, but just make sure you make the time
  • Try to squeeze in an extra pump at home, if you can, early in the morning after the baby has fed, or if your milk supply is high, pump one side and feed the baby on the other. This is a great tip to build up extra bottles quickly!
  • Have a shirt/bra stash for a random leak accident
  • Dress for a successful pump, meaning any top or dress you can get to your breasts easily. Be wary of silk if you don't catch the milk drips as it will leave a stain
  • Consider bottle bags with ice packs built in so you can toss and grab from freezer (not recommended for travel as TSA will require any ice pack not completely solid to be thrown away and you don't want to lose your whole cooler)
  • Place flanges and pump parts in the refrigerator between pumps so you don't have to wash them until the end of the day
  • Buy Medela Quick Clean Micro-steam sterilizing bags for extra convenience and good cleaning
  • When finished pumping have a towel either on your lap or ready to catch the drips as this can save clothing changes and or stains
  • Keep a full set of pump parts at work
  • Invest in a car charger and battery pack- many women pump on the drive in
  • Consider renting a bigger pump to keep in your office, or check to see if your office has them available
    We rent Hospital Grade Breast Pumps.

Travel Specific Tips for Working Flying Mama's

  • Buy a spare AC wall plug, a battery pack, batteries, and plane charger. You may need all options aircraft dependent. If you travel a lot make sure to test the batteries before you leave or have a spare set. Also note that some battery packs require 8 batteries (4 per side)
    We only carry a few pump parts on our website, but call either of our stores and we'll be happy to gather up what you need for pickup, or call the Hollywood store and we can have what you need shipped. Santa Monica: (310) 998-1981 Hollywood: (323) 469-5300.
  • Invest in lots of ice packs as you may be forced to throw them away if they are not frozen solid by the TSA, or as leaks may happen during transportation and they become dirty.
  • If pumping on the plane in the restroom let a flight attendant know, so they don't get concerned
  • Don't be afraid to pump in your seat- airplanes are extremely loud so you can't hear the pump. Bring a blanket, scarf, or in a pinch ask for an airplane blanket
  • Consider pumping one side at at time on the plane into a larger bottle so you can stick it right in the cooler and avoiding taking too much cooler space and/or having to pour the milk on the plane
  • Don't be afraid to try and pump in nice places if you're traveling- hotel ladies room lounges, airline lounges etc. One great spot is some lounges have showers you can use, which is a nice private room with water and plugs. A good backup is the family restrooms
  • Baristas and flight attendants will give you free ice if you need it while traveling
  • Buy and travel with milk storage bags, they take up less space in your cooler but bring at least two bottles for pumping on the plane, and so you have alternatives
  • Use your flange as funnel to pour the milk into the bags
  • Make sure you know milk transport guidelines- for example milk is good in a cooler for a TOTAL of 24 hours, so you can transport your milk, store it at your hotel in a refrigerator, and then transport it on a cooler back home as long as it is not in the freezer bag >24hrs
  • Call hotels ahead to make sure you have a refrigerator with a freezer in your room- they normally will charge you nothing if you say it is for breastmilk. Some minibar refrigerators are cool enough
  • If your hotel room doesn't have a freezer you will likely get push back from the hotel about freezing your ice because of food storage laws, so pack extra bags so you can make new ice packs if needed
  • Check to make sure your milk storage bags have little air and are sealed properly as the cabin pressure may cause them to open and leak
  • Plan to spend about 10 minutes longer then normal getting through security even with TSA PreCheck as they may want to do additional testing
Essential Breastfeeding Support and Baby Care Items
The Pump Station & Nurtury® has decades of experience providing new families with outstanding educational, breastfeeding and baby care support, including products and classes which can make all the difference to you and your baby. To see a list of some of the essential products that our Lactation Consultants have recommended, click Essential Breastfeeding and Baby Care Products

See Other Breastfeeding and Baby Care Help Topics

This article has not been prepared by a physician, is not intended as medical advice, and is not a substitute for regular medical care. Consult with a physician if medical symptoms or problems occur.

Download PDF Save & Print Continue reading